(via loftsmoke)




The truth is, unless you let go, unless you forgive yourself, unless you forgive the situation, unless you realize that the situation is over, you cannot move forward.
Steve Maraboli  (via miss-artificial)

(via miss-artificial)


Reblog if you dont shave your legs everyday.

my-herbal-journey:

I just want everyone to see how unrealistic some expectations are.

(via miss-artificial)


phases-of-our-moon:

If you don’t have binoculars, borrow a pair. If you have a telescope, make sure it’s in good working order.
People in North America are going to be able to see four lunar eclipses unfold during a two year period that begins late on the night of April 14th. The eclipses will occur about once every six months. It’s known as the tetrad. It’s not unusual to have one eclipse follow another. But it is rare to have four consecutive total lunar eclipses evenly spaced in time.
San Diego will be exposed to a second total eclipse on October 8th, a partial eclipse on April 4, 2015, and a total eclipse on Sept. 27, 2015.
During this month’s eclipse, people across San Diego County will begin to see the moon slip into Earth’s shadow at 9:55 p.m. on April 14th. The full eclipse starts at 12:08 a.m. April 15th, and the event ends at 3:36 a.m.
It could be a breathtaking event. Scientists say that if skies are clear, people will see the color of the moon change from a silvery white to a coppery red, then turn back to silver.
“The moon can take on a reddish appearance during a lunar eclipse because some sunlight gets through the Earth’s atmosphere and that light still hits the moon,” said Lisa Will, an astrophysicist at San Diego City College. “The parts of the atmosphere that the light is filtering through are over the locations along the earth’s terminator (the line between night and day) that are experiencing sunrise and sunset. So we’re basically seeing the light from sunrises and sunsets all over the Earth hitting the moon. Depending on atmospheric conditions, the moon can look yellow to vivid red.”
The eclipse is only one of a series of beautiful sites that will appear in local skies during 2014. Here’s a sample of what’s coming up.
APRIL 8: Mars and the sun will be on opposite sides of the sky as seen from Earth, a phenomenon known as opposition. This opposition occurs every 26 months. Mars will be easy to see on April 8. Look for it on the eastern horizon at sunset. Six days later, on April 14, Mars and Earth will reach their closest point to each other this year. They’ll be 57,166,149 miles apart. The two planets won’t get that close again until May 2016.

MAY 10: Saturn and the sun will be on opposite sides of the sky as seen from Earth — an opposition that occurs once a year. Saturn, the second largest planet in our solar system, will be visible as it rises in the southeast. Astronomer Dominic Ford says on his website, In-The-Sky.org that, “For a few hours around the exact moment of opposition, it may be possible to discern a marked brightening of Saturn’s rings in comparison to the planet’s disk, known as the Seeliger Effect.”
JUNE 7: The gibbous moon will pass within two degrees of Mars in the western sky, creating a pretty conjunction that should appeal to astrophotographers. Astronomy.org says the planets will be visible for six hours.
— Gary Robbins

phases-of-our-moon:

If you don’t have binoculars, borrow a pair. If you have a telescope, make sure it’s in good working order.

People in North America are going to be able to see four lunar eclipses unfold during a two year period that begins late on the night of April 14th. The eclipses will occur about once every six months. It’s known as the tetrad. It’s not unusual to have one eclipse follow another. But it is rare to have four consecutive total lunar eclipses evenly spaced in time.

San Diego will be exposed to a second total eclipse on October 8th, a partial eclipse on April 4, 2015, and a total eclipse on Sept. 27, 2015.

During this month’s eclipse, people across San Diego County will begin to see the moon slip into Earth’s shadow at 9:55 p.m. on April 14th. The full eclipse starts at 12:08 a.m. April 15th, and the event ends at 3:36 a.m.

It could be a breathtaking event. Scientists say that if skies are clear, people will see the color of the moon change from a silvery white to a coppery red, then turn back to silver.

“The moon can take on a reddish appearance during a lunar eclipse because some sunlight gets through the Earth’s atmosphere and that light still hits the moon,” said Lisa Will, an astrophysicist at San Diego City College. “The parts of the atmosphere that the light is filtering through are over the locations along the earth’s terminator (the line between night and day) that are experiencing sunrise and sunset. So we’re basically seeing the light from sunrises and sunsets all over the Earth hitting the moon. Depending on atmospheric conditions, the moon can look yellow to vivid red.”

The eclipse is only one of a series of beautiful sites that will appear in local skies during 2014. Here’s a sample of what’s coming up.

APRIL 8: Mars and the sun will be on opposite sides of the sky as seen from Earth, a phenomenon known as opposition. This opposition occurs every 26 months. Mars will be easy to see on April 8. Look for it on the eastern horizon at sunset. Six days later, on April 14, Mars and Earth will reach their closest point to each other this year. They’ll be 57,166,149 miles apart. The two planets won’t get that close again until May 2016.



MAY 10: Saturn and the sun will be on opposite sides of the sky as seen from Earth — an opposition that occurs once a year. Saturn, the second largest planet in our solar system, will be visible as it rises in the southeast. Astronomer Dominic Ford says on his website, In-The-Sky.org that, “For a few hours around the exact moment of opposition, it may be possible to discern a marked brightening of Saturn’s rings in comparison to the planet’s disk, known as the Seeliger Effect.”

JUNE 7: The gibbous moon will pass within two degrees of Mars in the western sky, creating a pretty conjunction that should appeal to astrophotographers. Astronomy.org says the planets will be visible for six hours.

— Gary Robbins

(via gothic-funky-techno-hippie)


here’s your daily reminder that

  • you aren’t worthless
  • you’re worth more than you think you are
  • you mean a lot to someone
  • you’ve done something to make someone laugh or smile
  • you’ve laughed and smiled
  • you’re good enough
  • you deserve to be happy
  • you’re allowed to be sad
  • you’re you and nothing can change that
  • and there’s no one else you need to be

(via miss-artificial)


doctorpuppet:

eringoblah:

I keep this blog focused on my art and animation work, but just this once, I’m going to go on a slight tangent to talk about how uncommonly kind Peter Capaldi is.
Backstory brief: Last year longtime fan fuckyespetercapaldi (speaking of uncommonly kind) spearheaded a Twelfth Doctor fanart/letter/photo collab on Tumblr and compiled all the contributions into a scrapbook, which she mailed to PCap for Christmas. More recently, he responded and those of us who contributed found ourselves receiving painted and autographed postcards like mine shown above.
Now, he could have drawn one picture, made photocopies for everyone and signed those and we would have been THRILLED. He didn’t do that.
He drew and painted this design multiple times by hand. He made sure each person had an individual, personally made piece. For a bunch of artists who know how much time and effort goes into our own art, it’s incredibly touching and unexpected. (And for me, he wrote both the worst and best thing he could have written, because drawing is hard but it’s worth keeping at it.)
Point is, Peter Capaldi is not just taking on his dream role; he’s aware that he’s just inherited a huge worldwide fanbase, and is trying his very hardest to do right by them. It’s a masterclass in class, so shoutout to the Doctor, for being the Doctor for us, before series 8 has even aired.
And now I have to keep drawing, dammit. Doctor’s orders.

Peter. Stop being so awesome.

doctorpuppet:

eringoblah:

I keep this blog focused on my art and animation work, but just this once, I’m going to go on a slight tangent to talk about how uncommonly kind Peter Capaldi is.

Backstory brief: Last year longtime fan fuckyespetercapaldi (speaking of uncommonly kind) spearheaded a Twelfth Doctor fanart/letter/photo collab on Tumblr and compiled all the contributions into a scrapbook, which she mailed to PCap for Christmas. More recently, he responded and those of us who contributed found ourselves receiving painted and autographed postcards like mine shown above.

Now, he could have drawn one picture, made photocopies for everyone and signed those and we would have been THRILLED. He didn’t do that.

He drew and painted this design multiple times by hand. He made sure each person had an individual, personally made piece. For a bunch of artists who know how much time and effort goes into our own art, it’s incredibly touching and unexpected. (And for me, he wrote both the worst and best thing he could have written, because drawing is hard but it’s worth keeping at it.)

Point is, Peter Capaldi is not just taking on his dream role; he’s aware that he’s just inherited a huge worldwide fanbase, and is trying his very hardest to do right by them. It’s a masterclass in class, so shoutout to the Doctor, for being the Doctor for us, before series 8 has even aired.

And now I have to keep drawing, dammit. Doctor’s orders.

Peter. Stop being so awesome.



dansrules:

disneyfab:

this literally gave me chills.

I’ve never hit the reblog button so fast in my life.

(via miss-artificial)